7 posts categorized "Tips for Lawyers"

June 12, 2019

How to Improve Statements of Work

15 questions to ask clients to help define scope
By Gary Richards, LegalBizDev

  1. What outcomes would you consider to be wins/successes for this matter?
  2. Are any other outcomes acceptable?
  3. If, unexpectedly, your objectives for this matter become unattainable, what would you do?
  4. What deadlines matter to you?
  5. How will you know when you are done?
  6. Do you have strict budget limits for this matter?
  7. During work on this matter, who will be the ultimate decision-maker?
  8. Can you envision anything that you or others in your organization could do to help ensure success of this matter?
  9. Do you have any fears or concerns about any special risk in this matter?
  10. Are there any dos or don’ts that you want to point out for us to observe during our legal work?
  11. What are the primary business effects of succeeding with this matter?
  12. Are there other stakeholders in your organization or other business activities or strategies that will be affected by the outcome of this matter?
  13. Do you have any other ongoing legal matters that could affect this matter in any way?
  14. Do you want to make progress reports on this matter to others in your organization? If so, when?
  15. Are there other related business problems you want to solve?

Reproduced with permission from the Legal Project Management Quick Reference Guide, Fourth Edition (© LegalBizDev, 2017).

 

May 29, 2019

Toby Brown on LPM and Perkins Coie’s Client Advantage™  (Part 2 of 2)

By Jim Hassett and Tim Batdorf


LegalBizDev:  Previously, you mentioned that the LPM team does work in three major areas: at the client level, the matter level, and coaching.  Let’s start with the client level.

Brown:  This type of support is generally offered to our largest clients.  For example, we have a large fixed price fee to handle over 500 legal matters for one long-term client.  Our group regularly reviews the actual legal work we’ve performed and compares it to the fixed fee we negotiated in advance.  Because we have a long-standing relationship built on mutual trust with this client, we can adjust the terms if there is a change in scope that will impact the fee. 

While LPM support typically includes this type of budget development and monitoring, the LPM team also works closely with key partners to identify and address the challenges each client cares most about. Each client is different. For example, one of our clients is currently focused on developing metrics to better manage the work and measure the results.  Another is refining our intake portal for new matters.  In that case, an LPM specialist works at the client’s office 1-3 days per week. 

LegalBizDev:  What type of feedback have you gotten from clients?

Brown: Clients absolutely love it.  Most of our large clients are very excited about this type of support, and are open to experimentation at the cutting edge of LPM services.  We have already gotten additional work as a result of LPM support, which is of course the ultimate proof that it is working.  For clients who are not interested, at this point the LPM team simply doesn’t work with them.

LegalBizDev:  What about matter level LPM support?

Brown:  This often starts with creating and monitoring budgets for lawyers that request our support.  But again, it can take other forms, depending on client needs. Given our limited LPM resources, this is generally limited to large matters.

LegalBizDev:  And coaching? 

Brown:  We have offered LPM training and coaching to entire legal teams, paralegals, and practice groups.  We also sometimes offer special individual coaching.  As our team grows, we expect to have more time for this kind of support.

LegalBizDev:  It sounds like your LPM initiatives are very much involved in business development.

Brown:  Yes.  To cite just one example, LPM Director Janelle Belling recently offered a presentation to the law department of one current client on ways to better define the scope of new legal matters.  We charged nothing for this presentation, but it has already increased the satisfaction of this client, and the precision of their statements of work with us.

Of course, LPM initiatives are aimed at increasing new business at many firms.  But our Client Advantage™ approach takes this to the next level.  And as a result of our track record of success, Perkins Coie partners are inviting Client Advantage™ team members to sales pitches more and more often.  Just yesterday, Janelle and I were included on the team that met with a very large potential new client, because the value we could add differentiates the firm from our competitors.

LegalBizDev:  When project managers work on a legal matter, do you directly bill the time they put in?

Brown:  Not very often, however it all depends on what each client wants and needs.  In the case of the large fixed fee I mentioned above, project management time is included in the total budget calculations for review purposes.  Some clients initially resist the idea of paying for non-lawyers, but their resistance declines when they see how project managers can manage to the bottom line cost.

LegalBizDev:  Where do you see LPM going in the next few years?

Brown:  You have to remember that law firms change very, very slowly.  By law firm standards, LPM is still a new field.  A decade ago, while many lawyers were focused on efficiency, almost none used the term LPM, or had formal processes in place to assure efficiency.

There is still an element of the “wild west” in the way LPM definitions and tactics vary from firm to firm.  But clients are forcing firms to accept efficiency, and I predict that in the coming years you will see more and more firms taking an integrated approach like ours to providing value. 

 

May 15, 2019

Toby Brown on LPM and Perkins Coie’s Client Advantage™  (Part 1 of 2)

By Jim Hassett and Tim Batdorf


Toby Brown is the Chief Practice Management Officer at Perkins Coie, a firm with more than 1,000 lawyers in offices across the United States and in Beijing, Shanghai and Taipei.  Toby has long been recognized as one of the leaders of the LPM movement, and is the founder of the leading annual conference on LPM, pricing and process improvement (the P3 Conference).

LegalBizDev:  When Law.com published an article last year about your approach to practice management, the headline was “The Law Firm Disrupted.”  Could you explain what they meant?

Brown:  The Law.com article focused on our Client Advantage™ program, describing it as a possible “template for future relationships between Big Law and corporate clients.”  It quoted several of our clients, including Lisa Konie, the Senior Director of Legal Operations at Adobe Systems Inc., who described the way we “truly worked together as if [we] were an extension of their legal team.”  Our web page includes an overview of the Client Advantage™ program which describes how it helps “clients drive efficiency, address a broad range of business challenges, and stay a step ahead of trends in legal services.” 

LegalBizDev:  For obvious reasons, my favorite example of the way Perkins Coie “stays a step ahead of trends” is the way you plan to offer key clients the license you recently purchased from us for the online fifth edition of our Legal Project Management Quick Reference Guide.  How do you expect this to work?

Brown:  Of course the primary benefit of the license will be internal.  We believe it will save our LPM staff time, and increase their impact, by providing us with an electronic library of over 150 LPM templates.  The LPM team can provide lawyers with exactly the information they need to increase efficiency, exactly when they need it.  For example, if a particular lawyer was having trouble writing a letter of engagement, LPM staff could email that lawyer a copy of the tool entitled “15 questions to ask clients to help define scope.” Or if another lawyer needed to delegate more effectively, he or she could be sent a template entitled “The delegation checklist.”  New tools and templates are added to the electronic library twice a year so that lawyers can easily keep up with developments in this rapidly changing field.

In terms of our Client Advantage™ program, one way we will “stay a step ahead of trends,” is by offering these templates to key clients, at no charge.  Law departments that want to improve their own use of LPM can benefit greatly from these tools.

This type of support and knowledge sharing has long been a key component of the Client Advantage™ program.  For example, when one large client was interested in improving their document management systems recently, we provided access to Perkins Coie employees who had been involved in installing our own document management systems.  They passed along all the valuable lessons they had learned in this process.  And again, there was no charge for this service.

LegalBizDev:  This sounds like the holy grail of law firm marketing, a truly unique selling proposition.

Brown:  I agree.  Business development professionals frequently talk about the need for “marketing differentiators” to set their firms apart.  But the classic problem in legal marketing is that there are too many good lawyers in the world.  And in too many cases, the only “unique selling proposition” the marketing department can come up with can be reduced to “our lawyers are better than your lawyers.”  In contrast, the Client Advantage™ program provides concrete deliverables that few if any of our competitors are offering.

LegalBizDev:  When I first read about your program, one of the things that struck me was that the team members listed on your web page range across a number of different departments that we don’t normally see working together with clients.

Brown:  That’s right.  Some of our members are obvious, from such departments as LPM,  pricing, business development and marketing.  But the team also includes members from other departments that are less obvious, including knowledge management, IT, training and development, billing and finance, diversity, pro bono, and recruiting.  Because of the importance of this program, our COO Steve Hedberg is also a key member of this group. 

LegalBizDev:  That’s quite a diverse group.  Could you give me an example of how it might work with one of the “less obvious” departments?

Brown:  One of the first things people often notice about our list is the inclusion of recruitment.  At most firms, laterals are recruited opportunistically, whenever rainmakers from other firms become available.  However, their success varies, in part because they may or may not focus in the areas that our current and future clients care most about.

Our Client Advantage™ group has helped tighten the process of talent acquisition so that it has focused on recruiting lawyers’ whose expertise will be most helpful to our clients, and whose books of business fit best with the firm’s strategic plan.  This has paid off in a big way.  In the last few years, we have substantially increased the revenue from lateral acquisitions.

LegalBizDev:  Could you tell me a little about how your LPM group is organized and what it focuses on?

Brown:  Our team is led by LPM Director Janelle Belling. We currently have four people exclusively devoted to LPM, are in the process of hiring two more, and often get help from pricing, finance and other groups.  Most of the work they perform is at the client level, managing large portfolios of work.  As time permits, the LPM team also provides assistance in two other areas:  at the matter level, and coaching to groups or individuals.

Detailed examples of tasks at the client level, matter level, and coaching will appear in Part 2 of this post.

July 12, 2018

Leading study confirms that ongoing LPM training and support significantly improves performance

By Tim Batdorf and Jim Hassett

If you work at a law firm and care about its future, you must find the time to download Altman Weil’s free report of findings from its 2018 Law Firms in Transition survey.

For the last ten years, this survey “has tracked a continual shift in awareness, acceptance – and some persistent resistance to – legal market change” (p. i). This year’s report by Thomas S. Clay and Eric A. Seeger provides the best available data on law firm efficiency, profitability, pricing, staffing, productivity, and much more. 

To collect the data, Altman Weil sent questionnaires to 801 managing partners and chairs at US firms with 50 lawyers or more.  In other professions, questionnaire surveys like this typically “average [a] 10-15% response rate.”  One might assume that the response rate for a survey sent to law firm managing partners and chairs would be much lower, since they are often too busy to respond to anything that is not on fire.  But Altman Weil received an astonishing 49.7% response rate (398 firms).

The resulting report summarizes the experience and opinions of managing partners and chairs from nearly half of the 500 largest firms in the United States.  It provides information about what law firms have tried, what’s worked, and what hasn’t.  There is simply no better source for this type of up-to-the-minute insight into a rapidly changing profession. 

The findings that caught our eyes first, not surprisingly, were the ones most closely related to our interest in legal project management (LPM), starting with the fact that “Nearly unanimously, law firm leaders see a need to focus on improved practice efficiency” (p. xii).

So, what are law firms doing to meet this need?  Not nearly enough.

One survey question asked, “How serious are law firms about changing their legal service delivery model to provide greater value to clients?” on a scale from 0 (not at all serious) to 10 (doing all they can).  Less than half of firms (43%) gave themselves a rating of 6 or higher, and only 2.6% answered 9 or 10

But wait, it gets even worse.  In its most recent 2017 Chief Legal Officers survey,  Altman Weil asked the exact same question of clients.  Only 9% of clients (vs 43% of firms) rated this commitment at 6 or higher, and not one single client gave law firms a 9 or a 10.  Obviously, a huge discrepancy exists in how law firms perceive themselves vs how clients perceive law firms. Viewing these results optimistically, law firms that are committed to changing their legal service delivery model could have a significant business opportunity. 

From our perspective, the single most important graph in the 2018 Law Firms in Transition report (p. 55) is reproduced below:LFiT_EfficiencyTactics_2018B“Rewarding efficiency and profitability in compensation decisions” was the most effective tactic for improving performance, as almost anyone could have predicted.  You get what you pay for. 

Much to our surprise, however, more than half of law firms say they are already using this tactic.  Of course, the other law firms may not want to engage in the difficult process of re-evaluating compensation policies, particularly when they know how difficult those conversations can be.  And if this is the only tactic a law firm takes, it could derail significant progress for several months, if not years.  Unfortunately, in today’s market, time may not be a luxury that law firms can afford.

In addition, law firms have historically had trouble measuring and rewarding profitability.  A few years ago, when we interviewed AmLaw 200 managing partners and senior executives for our book Client Value and Law Firm Profitability, we reported that many firms are struggling with measurement, like the participant who admitted:

We don’t calculate profitability by formula.  It’s really seat of the pants. (p. 52)

As more and more firms improve the ways they measure and reward profitability, we predict that the impact of compensation on performance will increase far beyond the 47% figure in the graph above.  But again, this type of approach will likely take a few more years to fully materialize in many firms and is definitely not a “magic bullet” solution for any firm.

So, what exactly should law firms be doing now to help lawyers increase efficiency?  They should engage in “ongoing project management training and support,” because:

  • It is the highest-rated tactic for obtaining significant improvement in performance (other than changing compensation policies, as discussed above),
  • It is grossly underutilized with only one-third of law firms actually using this tactic, and
  • It is the easiest and most cost-effective way to significantly improve performance, especially when compared to other less effective tactics like systematically reengineering work processes or using technology tools to replace human resources.

Whatever tactics law firms decide to pursue, Altman Weil’s report (p. viii) concludes that law firm leaders must “pick up the pace:”

The challenge for leaders is to enlist a small cohort to start the innovation process with urgency and pace and begin to educate and bring others into the fold as rapidly as possible.  Leaders should focus daily on supporting the continued efforts of early adopters by providing encouragement, resources, time, and staff support.

We couldn’t agree more. 

For details of exactly how several leading firms have engaged this process, and the successes they have achieved to date, see the case studies section of our web page.

Full disclosure:  Altman Weil is a strategic partner of LegalBizDev, but not a single word of this post would be different if they weren’t.

 

December 08, 2010

Questions and answers about Certified Legal Project Managers™ (Part 3 of 3)

This post concludes my answers to the questions from Paul Easton, author of the Legal Project Management blogFor an update on the certification program’s status, see today’s press release on BusinessWire.

 

Paul’s question: I find it interesting that the program is customized to the individual attorney. The certification process begins with “an initial assessment telecon interview to determine each lawyer’s background and needs” and the study materials are selected based upon this interview. In short, this is not a standardized course. This seems like a great program from the learner’s perspective, but doesn’t the lack of standardization make it more difficult for the industry and legal employers to understand what skills this certification represents its holders as having?

The Certified Legal Project Manager™ Program is designed first and foremost to guarantee mastery of a baseline level of knowledge, which will be the same for every lawyer who completes the program.

However, lawyers will come into this program with different expectations and backgrounds, so it is important that the program also be tailored to fit each participant’s needs.  This will be accomplished in three main ways:

  1. In Module 1, questions are framed in terms of each specific practice.  For example, when defining a statement of work, participants are asked “What are the most important elements for your practice?” not “What are the most important elements in general?”
  2. The list of readings in Module 1 includes many suggestions for “supplementary readings” useful for lawyers who want to go beyond the minimum, including those who come to the program with a higher level of basic knowledge
  3. All of Module 2 is devoted to applying key concepts to an actual matter from each lawyer’s practice

The idea of also creating a unique reading list for each individual is an element of the program that appeared in the preliminary outline you reviewed, but which was changed as a result of discussions with the Certification Advisory Board.  Everyone will work from the same basic reading list.  It will include many options, enabling each lawyer to customize readings for themselves.

Paul’s question: Tell me more about the reference library that program participants use in their studies. What does it include? Is it all original material? 

Each participant will receive a library of six widely respected project management texts with a total of more than 2,500 pages, including my Legal Project Management Quick Reference Guide and A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) by the Project Management Institute. 

In Module 1 of the program, lawyers will be sent a list of open-book essay questions, along with a reading list suggesting exactly which sections of these books will be most useful.  In Module 2 and beyond, they will continue to use these books whenever they need access to more advanced information.

Paul’s question: What impact do you think or hope that this certificate program will have on legal-project management as a discipline and on the legal industry as a whole? 

Of course we hope that this program will help raise standards so lawyers can better meet client needs.  However, in all honesty, we do not believe that legal project management certification is necessary, or even desirable, for every lawyer.  LegalBizDev offers a number of other programs which we think would be a better fit for most lawyers, including several types of "just in time training" and an Introduction to Legal Project Management course.  Certification is designed for those who want to go a step further and guarantee a solid foundation in both knowledge and skills. 

Paul’s question: Where do you see demand for your certificate program in ten years? 

To be honest, I have trouble predicting ten months from now, so I am reluctant to try to predict ten years.  But I do feel safe in predicting that the marketplace will make some lawyers winners and some losers over the next ten years, and that lawyers who master legal project management are far more likely to be among the winners.  That does not mean they have to be certified, but it does mean they will have to pick up these basic skills somewhere, somehow.

December 01, 2010

Questions and answers about Certified Legal Project Managers™ (Part 2 of 3)

A few weeks ago, I posted the first answers to a series of questions Paul Easton, author of the Legal Project Management blog, had asked when we announced our new certification program.  I postponed the next installment until today, when the first group begins the certification process. 


Paul’s question: You designed this program in response to a request from “an 800-lawyer firm [who] asked [you] to design a formal certification program for two senior partners.” Is your program targeted exclusively at large firms?  Would a small firm or solo practitioner benefit from your program?

The principles apply to firms of any size.  The first two people to sign up were the two senior partners from Squire Sanders who requested the program.  (As a result of its recent merger with Hammonds, it now has over 1,200 lawyers.)  But the third person to sign up was a lawyer from a nine-lawyer firm in Australia that learned of the program over the web.  And the fourth and fifth people were from Stewart McKelvey, a Canadian firm with over 200 lawyers. So we already have evidence that the program meets a need in firms of all sizes. 

Paul’s question: One of the eligibility requirements is that you must be a practicing lawyer with 10 years experience. Why not legal-support professionals (e.g., paralegal, litigation support, and legal IT staff)?  Aren’t they more likely to fill the legal-project manager role than lawyers?

In November, the LegalBizDev Certification Advisory Board reviewed the preliminary outline which you saw, and modified a few of the details, including eliminating the ten-year requirement. Our program’s prerequisite is now defined as “practicing lawyers who have at least three years of experience managing large legal matters.”  We are currently working with a small group of paralegals to determine the best way to adapt our program to meet their needs, and will announce the results early next year.

Paul’s question: Who sits on LegalBizDev’s Certification Advisory Board? 

The board has fourteen members from firms with a total of over 10,000 lawyers, including:

Borden Ladner Gervais – Andrew Terrett
Fasken Martineau – Howard Kaufman
Ford & Harrison – Kay Wolf
McDermott Will & Emery – Byron Kalogerou
Stewart McKelvey – James Dickson
Miles & Stockbridge – David Eberhardt
Morgan Lewis – Richard Rosenblatt
O’Melveny & Myers – Stacie McLean
Squire Sanders – Stacy D. Ballin
Williams Mullen – John Paris

The remaining board members have chosen to remain anonymous.

Paul’s question: How do you determine if the experiential requirement is met? For example, I passed my first bar exam in late 2001, but for the past six years I’ve worked in legal staffing and project management, primarily for large electronic-discovery projects. At the end of 2011, would I qualify for this certification?

Decisions will be made case by case.  Based on what you wrote here, I am guessing that the “practicing lawyer” part of the requirement does not fit you.  However, as I noted, we are currently exploring the idea of parallel programs that fit the needs of other audiences.

Paul’s question: Do you plan to eventually design an entry level certification for lawyers who want to learn project management and differentiate themselves from their competition, but who do not have the requisite legal experience for your professional certification?

We are not planning an entry level certification at this time, but as Nobel prize winning physicist Neils Bohr famously said, “It is hard to predict, especially the future.”

Paul’s question: Why do lawyers need more initials after their names? After all, obtaining a JD and passing a bar exam qualifies a lawyer to practice law. Also, shouldn’t experienced lawyers know how to manage their cases?

Lawyers certainly don't need more initials.  But many do need the knowledge and skills this program will provide.  While experienced lawyers typically do know how to manage matters the old way, the “new normal” demands new management skills.  Until recently, generations of lawyers were never asked to be more efficient, so it is not surprising that they could use some help. 

Paul’s question: What is your certification’s formal title and initials? 

The program title is Certified Legal Project Manager™.  We do not expect people to use the initials.

Paul’s question: Two years ago, almost no one was talking about legal-project management. Has awareness of and demand for legal-project management grown so much in a couple of years to create the demand needed to support a certificate program? 

Absolutely yes.

Paul’s question: Is legal-project management just another management fad? 

We believe that clients are making this paradigm shift permanent.  Once law firms learn to deliver the same high quality more efficiently, why would clients ever want to go back?

November 10, 2010

Questions and answers about Certified Legal Project Managers™ (Part 1)

The day after we published our press release announcing the first certification program for legal project managers, I got an email from Paul Easton, author of the influential blog Legal Project Management, with a long list of interesting and insightful questions about our program.  Indeed, the list was so long and so insightful that it is going to take me several posts to answer all the questions Paul sent.

Some must wait until December, when the program is officially launched.  But this week I want to immediately answer a few of the most critical questions.

Paul’s question: What does this certification represent? How will program participants, their employers, and their clients benefit from this certificate?

The Certified Legal Project Manager™ program is designed to help lawyers apply proven best practices from other law firms and other professions to: 

• Reduce or eliminate surprises
• Reduce write-offs
• Protect profitability
• Improve process control
• Improve communication with clients
• Deliver greater value to clients
• Focus on clients’ true needs
• Increase new business

The program aims to set standards for legal project management and to give clients confidence in their lawyers’ fundamental knowledge of this new field, and in their ability to apply the concepts to the practice of law.

To earn certification, each lawyer must pass tests on core concepts and terminology, and also demonstrate the ability to apply the ideas to real-world legal matters.  The certification process also includes practice using a reference library supplied with the program to look up just the information they need, exactly when they need it.

This month, the LegalBizDev Certification Advisory Board is reviewing the details of our approach to assure that it meets these goals.  The Board currently includes six lawyers and four project managers from ten firms with a total of over 6,000 lawyers. 

Board member Howard Kaufman of Fasken Martineau explained why lawyers could find a program like this useful:

As a lawyer my primary reason for wanting this type of program is to learn how to use project management in the practice of law. What I will learn about project management is only of interest to me if I can do something with it in my practice. To be able to "broadcast" a third party’s evaluation of my project management skill in the practice of law is great for marketing/business development purposes, but that is a secondary reason for taking the program.

In the program summary that I sent to Board members, I wrote that “Legal project management certification is not necessary, or even desirable, for every lawyer.”  We offer several programs that require less time, including training workshops to increase knowledge, and coaching programs to practice on the job skills. (Note: If you look for details of our training and coaching programs on the web you won’t find them, because we don’t want to reveal the details of our proprietary approach to competitors.  However, if you work for a law firm or in-house law department we would be happy to send them to you if you email info@legalbizdev.com.)  

In our opinion, our training and coaching programs are more than enough to meet the needs of most lawyers.  Certification is designed for those who want to go a step further, and guarantee a solid foundation in both knowledge and skills.

However, the term certification also comes with a lot of baggage which does not apply to our program.  And that leads to a more technical question on the list.

Paul’s question: If lawyers want to be project managers, why not obtain a PMP or CAPM? Doesn’t JD+PMP=LPM?

While every project manager in the world knows what a PMP is, it is a rare lawyer who knows that PMP stands for Project Management Professional.  This is the best known of five certifications offered  by the Project Management Institute (PMI), which is described on its web page as “The world’s leading not-for-profit membership association for the project management profession, with more than half a million members and credential holders in 185 countries”

PMP is widely considered the gold standard certification for project managers.  According to Wikipedia, 393,413 people held this certificate as of last July.  By contrast, the CAPM – Certified Associate in Project Management – is an entry level program, with, according to one recent count fewer than 10,000 certificate holders. Both deal with the same basic approach and content (summarized in PMI’s Project Management Book of Knowledge, which is one of the books we include in our program’s reference library), so I will focus this discussion on the PMP.

Requirements for the PMP include 4,500 hours of project management experience, 35 contact hours of project management education, and passing a 200-item test which can take many additional hours to study for.  How many lawyers do you know who have time for that, especially if much of the content is clearly not relevant to their practice?

The sixth edition of the PMP Exam Prep guide by Rita Mulcahy includes a list of key concepts you should have mastered in your 4,500 hours of experience before you start studying for the exam, including Monte Carlo analysis, schedule compression, managing float, and how to manually create a network diagram (p. 3).  Perhaps even more off-putting from a lawyers’ point of view is Mulcahy’s observation that “The exam tests from the perspective of…a large project that involves 200 people from many countries, takes at least a year, has never been done before in the organization, and has a budget of US $100 million dollars or more” (p. 17).  Hardly the profile of a typical legal matter.

Somewhere in the world, there are lawyers who can benefit from a PMP.  But we believe that there is a much larger number who, like Mr. Kaufman, are looking for something that can help them manage legal projects quickly and efficiently, without spending time on concepts that are clearly not relevant. 

Paul’s question: Will the program provide participants with MCLE credits? 

We are currently exploring the possibility providing MCLE credits.  But given the fact that so much about legal project management is new, and that the process for getting MCLE credits approved in many jurisdictions is time consuming, it may take time to provide a definitive answer.

Paul’s question: Where can those interested go for more information and application materials? 

We will post information and applications on our web page after the program is officially underway in December.  If you’d like to consider joining the first group that begins the certification process on December 1, email info@legalbizdev.com for more information.