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May 29, 2019

Toby Brown on LPM and Perkins Coie’s Client Advantage™  (Part 2 of 2)

By Jim Hassett and Tim Batdorf


LegalBizDev:  Previously, you mentioned that the LPM team does work in three major areas: at the client level, the matter level, and coaching.  Let’s start with the client level.

Brown:  This type of support is generally offered to our largest clients.  For example, we have a large fixed price fee to handle over 500 legal matters for one long-term client.  Our group regularly reviews the actual legal work we’ve performed and compares it to the fixed fee we negotiated in advance.  Because we have a long-standing relationship built on mutual trust with this client, we can adjust the terms if there is a change in scope that will impact the fee. 

While LPM support typically includes this type of budget development and monitoring, the LPM team also works closely with key partners to identify and address the challenges each client cares most about. Each client is different. For example, one of our clients is currently focused on developing metrics to better manage the work and measure the results.  Another is refining our intake portal for new matters.  In that case, an LPM specialist works at the client’s office 1-3 days per week. 

LegalBizDev:  What type of feedback have you gotten from clients?

Brown: Clients absolutely love it.  Most of our large clients are very excited about this type of support, and are open to experimentation at the cutting edge of LPM services.  We have already gotten additional work as a result of LPM support, which is of course the ultimate proof that it is working.  For clients who are not interested, at this point the LPM team simply doesn’t work with them.

LegalBizDev:  What about matter level LPM support?

Brown:  This often starts with creating and monitoring budgets for lawyers that request our support.  But again, it can take other forms, depending on client needs. Given our limited LPM resources, this is generally limited to large matters.

LegalBizDev:  And coaching? 

Brown:  We have offered LPM training and coaching to entire legal teams, paralegals, and practice groups.  We also sometimes offer special individual coaching.  As our team grows, we expect to have more time for this kind of support.

LegalBizDev:  It sounds like your LPM initiatives are very much involved in business development.

Brown:  Yes.  To cite just one example, LPM Director Janelle Belling recently offered a presentation to the law department of one current client on ways to better define the scope of new legal matters.  We charged nothing for this presentation, but it has already increased the satisfaction of this client, and the precision of their statements of work with us.

Of course, LPM initiatives are aimed at increasing new business at many firms.  But our Client Advantage™ approach takes this to the next level.  And as a result of our track record of success, Perkins Coie partners are inviting Client Advantage™ team members to sales pitches more and more often.  Just yesterday, Janelle and I were included on the team that met with a very large potential new client, because the value we could add differentiates the firm from our competitors.

LegalBizDev:  When project managers work on a legal matter, do you directly bill the time they put in?

Brown:  Not very often, however it all depends on what each client wants and needs.  In the case of the large fixed fee I mentioned above, project management time is included in the total budget calculations for review purposes.  Some clients initially resist the idea of paying for non-lawyers, but their resistance declines when they see how project managers can manage to the bottom line cost.

LegalBizDev:  Where do you see LPM going in the next few years?

Brown:  You have to remember that law firms change very, very slowly.  By law firm standards, LPM is still a new field.  A decade ago, while many lawyers were focused on efficiency, almost none used the term LPM, or had formal processes in place to assure efficiency.

There is still an element of the “wild west” in the way LPM definitions and tactics vary from firm to firm.  But clients are forcing firms to accept efficiency, and I predict that in the coming years you will see more and more firms taking an integrated approach like ours to providing value. 

 

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