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November 14, 2018

A one minute self-assessment:  Could legal project management help you?  

By Jim Hassett and Tim Batdorf

Question 1:  Could you increase client satisfaction?

Question 2:  Could you increase realization or profitability?

If you answer YES to either question, legal project management (LPM) could definitely help you. 

If your firm has begun an LPM initiative, first determine whether there is an LPM team at your firm that can  meet your needs.  If you’d like to learn more about our one-to-one LPM coaching, see https://tinyurl.com/LPM-Coach18J.

If you answer NO to both questions, you may not need to devote time to LPM.  But are you sure you’re right?

Regarding client satisfaction (Question 1):  Research has consistently shown that many lawyers overrate client satisfaction.  For example, in a survey published by Inside Counsel  magazine in July 2008, 43% of lawyers thought clients would give them an “A” for their work, but only 17% of their clients agreed.

Regarding realization and profitability (Question 2):  Have you checked with your financial department to determine how your personal realization or profitability compares to firm goals, and to other lawyers in your group?  If not, it might be worthwhile to see how you compare before answering this question.

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