45 posts categorized "News"

July 12, 2017

Legal project management and business development (Part 2 of 2)

By Jim Hassett and Jonathan Groner

Stuart J.T. Dodds is director of global pricing and LPM at Baker McKenzie, one of the largest law firms in the world, with over 4,500 lawyers and 77 offices in 47 countries.  Dodds is widely recognized as a leader in linking LPM to business development, and he is the author of two related books published by the American Bar Association:  Smarter Pricing, Smarter Profit, and Pricing on the Front Line.

In a recent interview, Dodds noted that

In RFPs lately, we have seen very specific questions such as, ‘Do you have project managers who have certification? How and where have they supported client matters? Can you give us case studies for how you would deliver LPM concepts in a specific commercial situation?’ This gives the client a good basis to compare one firm with another. It’s more than the words on the page. It’s what the firm actually does. I think this is a very healthy development.

In fact, Dodds says, members of the senior project manager team that he heads (including over 40 project managers) typically become directly involved in the pitching process and interact with prospective clients as part of the business development team. 

This is how we tell the client that we will engage with them, if we are selected. We will take these nonlegal professionals into the client discussions in order to achieve the best result for the client.

When the firm begins work on a large client matter, a project manager is assigned to work alongside the attorneys. For smaller matters, the firm relies on a training program that it developed and executed in-house, in which all of its attorneys have been trained in project management to a high enough level that they can handle the basics of budgeting and planning, with occasional assistance from a project manager. As Dodds says, in those instances the use of LPM is “attorney-driven but expert-supported.”

Interestingly, as director of global pricing and LPM, Dodds reports to the firm’s Chief Marketing Officer. His 40 project managers are an integral part of the global firm’s nearly 400-person-strong marketing staff.

We see ourselves as part of the value proposition for our clients. We are not a cost to the firm. Rather, we contribute to the profitability of the firm.

This type of integration with the marketing department is currently unusual, but may reflect a growing trend.  In 2015, we published an article related to this topic in Bloomberg BNA’s Corporate Counsel Weekly™ entitled “Why Law Firms Must Change Their Marketing Priorities.”

The article started with an account of how Kramer Levin, a firm with over 350 lawyers in New York, Silicon Valley, and Paris, hired Jennifer Manton as its Chief Marketing Officer in 2014 in part because of her experience in using LPM to meet client demands for improved communication and efficiency.  One of the first things she did after starting at the firm was to arrange for seven lawyers to complete LegalBizDev’s one-to-one LPM coaching.  This pilot program led to increased confidence and ability to provide better price estimates, client communications and more.  Since then, Kramer Levin has gradually expanded this program with more coaching and other LPM initiatives.

However, our Bloomberg article also noted that

One of the many interesting things about this story is that Manton is a former president of the international Legal Marketing Association (LMA), which in the past reflected the nature of the profession by being associated with a more traditional approach to marketing. Marketing is often defined by the ‘Four Ps’: price, product, promotion, and place. Historically, law firm marketing departments have been involved almost exclusively in promotion. In today’s economic environment, that is a recipe for disaster.

It would be nice to report that since that article was published the approach of legal marketers has changed rapidly, but the phrase “rapid change” is rarely found in articles about law firms.

In fairness, LMA has recognized the importance of these issues by organizing an annual “P3 conference” (focusing on the “three Ps” of pricing, project management and process improvement, all of which are included in our definition of LPM).  However, to see how little integration has occurred to date between marketing and LPM, one need look no further than the titles of the speakers at this conference.  Of the 69 speakers at the most recent P3 conference, only 10% had titles that included words like marketing, business development or sales.

Nobody has ever said that implementing LPM will be fast or easy.  But the firms that are effective today in changing lawyers’ behavior, delivering more value, and meeting client needs will be tomorrow’s leaders in business development.

 

June 14, 2017

New research on how to improve legal efficiency, and much more

According to Altman Weil’s recently released 2017 Law Firms in Transition (LFiT) survey the top two trends that are transforming the legal profession are “More price competition” (95% of the 386 managing partners and chairs who participated in the survey said this is a permanent change) and “Focus on improved efficiency” (94% said this is permanent).

So what are law firms doing about these fundamental changes in the marketplace?  Not nearly enough. 

When the LFiT survey asked “Has your firm significantly changed its strategic approach to the efficiency of legal service delivery?” only 49% said yes.  (20% said it was “under consideration,” and the remaining 31% replied with a flat no.)  These proportions have been surprisingly steady for the five years that Altman Weil has been asking this question.  It seems that about 20% of firms have been considering change since 2013, but they still haven’t done anything about it.  

Could the slow rate of change reflect the fact that clients don’t really care about efficiency?

No, that’s not it. In Altman Weil’s most recent Chief Legal Officer survey, the number one service innovation that clients wanted was “greater cost reduction.”  There are only two ways to meet this fundamental requirement:  become more efficient, or cut into your prices and profits with discounts.  (These days, most firms seem to be choosing deep discounts, sometimes to the point of what consultant Bruce MacEwen has called suicide pricing.”) 

Could the failure to act reflect a belief that the pace of change will slow down, or that it doesn’t matter? 

No, that’s not it either.  In fact, 72% of the LFiT respondents believe that the pace of change in the legal profession will increase (p. 2).  The fact that more than half of all law firm partners are “not sufficiently busy” (p. 36) also suggests that the forces of supply and demand will continue to put downward pressure on prices. And in our research for the book Client Value and Law Firm Profitability, 85% of AmLaw 200 leaders said that firms will have a competitive advantage if they change more quickly.

When LFiT respondents were asked “how serious are law firms about changing their legal service delivery model to provide greater value to clients?” the median rating was just 5 on a scale from 0 to 10 (p. 11).  If that’s not bad enough, clients think it’s even worse.  When clients were asked the same question in the Chief Legal Officers Survey, their median rating was a distressing 3 out of 10 (p. 23).

When directly asked “Why isn’t your firm doing more to change the way it delivers legal services?” the number one answer was “partners resist most change efforts” (65%, see p. 14).

Summing it up: Clients want lower prices; more than 9 out of 10 law firm leaders believe there is a need to become more efficient; but less than half of law firms are doing anything about it.  These results may be alarming, but for grizzled law firm veterans, they are not really surprising. 

As Eric Seeger and Tom Clay, the authors of the LFiT, noted on the first page of their report (p. i) “Law firms are slowly changing [but]… we see firms making only cursory investments where they should be aiming for broader, deeper transformation.  And still many partners resist change in all its forms.”

But wait, the slow pace of change is not the only problem.  It gets worse.  When law firms do try to change, they often employ the wrong tactics. 

This year, for the first time, Altman Weil listed eight of the most common tactics to increase efficiency, and they asked which ones each firm was pursuing. More importantly, they asked which tactics “have resulted in a significant improvement in firm performance?”  The graph below (adapted from p. 57) summarizes their findings:

LFiT_Graphic_DSJ2

Note that the two tactics that firms are using most often (knowledge management and using technology tools to replace human resources) are among the least likely to actually improve performance. And the two that have had the greatest impact (shifting work to contract lawyers and to paraprofessionals) are among those least used.  Clearly firms should reconsider their priorities.

If you study the graph above closely, you may also notice another fact that supports an argument we’ve been making for years:  project management training finished dead last in effectiveness.  In 2010, many firms first became aware of LPM when one AmLaw 100 firm got a lot of headlines by training every partner in their firm.  Lawyers love precedent, so that led to a fad of LPM training.  As explained in a post in this blog we here at LegalBizDev refused to participate in this fad, and declined to bid on RFPs that took this approach.  We knew from our two decades in the training business that it would simply not work.  As noted, in our recent posts on the “Top five ways to increase LPM results:   

It is not exactly news that education does not necessarily lead to behavior change. Taking a workshop about how to lead a healthier life by exercising regularly, losing weight, and eating more vegetables does not mean that you will actually do any of these things.

That’s why for years we have recommended that firms start with one-to-one coaching to solve problems that lawyers care about and to produce behavior change and quick wins.  These tactics have been proven to overcome the partner resistance which is slowing so many firms.

While this post focuses on efficiency data, that’s just the tip of the iceberg of the 124 page, free 2017 LFiT report.  The report provides a gold mine of additional data on the key topics that law firms need to focus on to prosper in the current climate, including profitability, staffing, and growth.

Many of these findings should affect your strategy.  To cite just one example, the tactic that law firms rely on most to improve pricing – developing data on the cost of services sold – is also the least likely to improve firm performance (p. 62).  The tactic that is most likely to improve performance is also the one used least often:  adding a pricing director or assigning pricing responsibilities to a current staff member.

As Seeger and Clay summed it up (p. iv): 

Firms that pursue thoughtful efficiency initiatives and stick with them will improve internal performance and add value for clients.  Firms that do not will experience competitive disadvantage over time.  It can cost very little to test-run pilot programs in these areas, and we believe it is an investment worth making.

 

A free copy of the 2017 LFiT can be downloaded from the Altman Weil website

Full disclosure:  LegalBizDev is a strategic partner of Altman Weil, and we specialize in the very types of pilot programs they recommend.

 

April 05, 2017

A change in this blog, and more

Since I started writing this blog in June 2005, I have published 667 posts: at least one per week.

Have you had time to read them all? I didn’t think so.

I have now decided to reduce the frequency of posts in this blog to every other Wednesday. The next post will appear on Wednesday, April 19.

This change is related to my new position as LegalBizDev’s chairman. Our COO Tim Batdorf has taken over responsibility of all day-to-day responsibilities of running LegalBizDev so that I can have more time for research and writing on how to improve LPM results. Some of this research will appear in this blog and some will be developed for the exclusive use of clients who license our new LPM Tools and Templates.

September 28, 2016

Fourth edition of our Legal Project Management Quick Reference Guide published today

Vincent Cino, the chairman of Jackson Lewis, calls the fourth edition of our LPM Quick Reference Guide, “A must read.” According to Toby Brown, the chief practice management officer at Perkins Coie, “Every partner should use this book.” And Melissa Prince, the director of pricing and LPM at Ballard Spahr, calls it her “LPM bible.” The book opens with extended comments from these three experts, and 19 others, who describe how this encyclopedia of tools and templates can help lawyers increase value, client satisfaction, and firm profitability for both hourly and alternative fee arrangements.

When the first edition of this Guide appeared in 2010, LPM was essentially a brand new field, and this was the only book that explained “how to do it.” Since then, LPM has grown rapidly and become a mainstay of law firm practice.  At 400 pages, the fourth edition is almost twice as long as the third edition was, reflecting recent advances in the field.  

The philosophy of this Quick Reference Guide is summarized in its first few pages:

Please do not read this book.

This Quick Reference Guide is an encyclopedia of techniques to help lawyers become more efficient. Very few lawyers have the time to read this encyclopedia cover to cover. And even for the ones who do, merely reading about LPM will not make anyone more efficient. This book is designed to help you quickly identify the tactics that will have the greatest impact on your practice and adapt them to meet your needs.

Legal project management increases client satisfaction and firm profitability by applying proven techniques to improve the management of legal matters. It is not a simple set of steps that lawyers should apply to every case or matter, but rather a toolbox which includes a broad array of procedures and templates. Each lawyer must find the tools and tactics that will have the greatest impact for them…

Our examples draw on a rich and deep body of knowledge that project managers have developed over the last several decades to help businesses run more efficiently. This book describes and adapts the tactics that lawyers find most useful and ignores the rest.

LegalBizDev principal Mike Egnatchik is my co-author for the fourth edition, and the book also includes sections written by 25 contributing authors, including such thought leaders as Stuart J T Dodds of Baker & McKenzie, Richard G. Rosenblatt of Morgan Lewis, Tom Clay of Altman Weil, and the Law Firm Value Committee of the Association of Corporate Counsel.

The 412-page, 8.5” x 11” paperback can be ordered for $99.95 by email (info@legalbizdev.com), fax (917-386-2733), phone (1-800-49-TRAIN), or mail (LegalBizDev, 225 Franklin Street, 26th Floor, Boston, MA 02110). More information appears on our web page, including an order form showing the volume discounts on orders of two or more copies.

In association with the publication of this book, LegalBizDev is also introducing several new LPM products and services which use these tools and templates in:

  • Just-in-time training
  • Just-in-time support
  • Traditional training
  • Certification

For more details, contact us today (info@legalbizdev.com, 800-49-TRAIN).

June 15, 2016

A free research report you can’t afford to miss

If you are the slightest bit interested in how the legal profession is changing and what it means to you, I hope you’ve already seen Altman Weil’s recent release of its annual Law Firms in Transition survey. But just in case you’ve been a little busy and missed it, I highly recommend that you download it today. The report costs nothing, but failing to find time to plan for the future could cost you quite a lot. (Full disclosure: LegalBizDev is a strategic partner of Altman Weil, but I would write exactly this same post even if we weren’t.)

The summary of the opinions of 356 managing partners and chairs is just a few pages long and covers a broad array of areas, with insights and recommendations focused on five key findings (p. i):

• Unreliable demand
• Surplus of lawyers
• Inefficient delivery of legal services
• Proactivity as a competitive advantage
• Resistance to change

The first question that appears in the detailed section of the report is, “Which of the following legal market trends do you think are temporary and which will be permanent?” The top three answers were more price competition (95% think this is permanent), focus on improved practice efficiency (93%), and more commoditized legal work (88%) (p. 1). Of course, all three can be addressed through legal project management (LPM).

But when Altman Weil asked the same group “Has your firm significantly changed its strategic approach to efficiency of legal service delivery?” only 44% said yes (26% said no and 30% said changes were “under consideration”). To put it another way, the majority of firms know what the biggest challenges to their future are, but they are not doing much to address them.

Personally, I think the true problem is much worse, and that most respondents exaggerated their efforts when they answered this question. I spend my life talking to law firm leaders about what they are doing to increase efficiency, and my guess is that the percent of firms that have made significant changes is closer to four percent than to 44.

The gap between what firms should be doing and what they are actually doing has existed for years, and the survey also dug into the details of what’s behind the problem. Authors Eric Seeger and Tom Clay concluded, “The biggest impediment to change, identified by 64% of law firm leaders, is that partners resist most change efforts” (p. vi). As a long-term strategy in a profession where client demands are changing rapidly, that’s a great way to insure that your job will be in danger.

The survey results include considerable documentation of the trouble that is already here, and of more trouble around the corner. For example, another question asked, “Which of the following activities is your firm proactively initiating to better understand what clients want?” (p. 9). I found the results particularly interesting because last fall, Altman Weil’s Chief Legal Officer survey asked for the client perspective on the exact same list of activities: “Rate the value to your law department of the following things law firms can do to better understand your organization.”

Comparing the answers revealed that many law firms are wasting their time doing the wrong things. “Conversations about matter management efficiency” ranked second in value for clients but only fifth among the things that firms were actually doing. “Post-matter reviews” ranked fifth for clients but was number 9 out of 10 for law firms. Of course, both of the factors that clients rated highly are key elements of LPM.

Meanwhile, some of the things that law firms are doing with their marketing time and money are of very low value from the client perspective. “Law firm participation in industry groups and events” ranked #2 for law firms, but #8 for clients. And “visits from law firm management” was #4 for law firms, but finished dead last in value – #10 out of 10 – in the eyes of clients.

In summary, this free report includes the best available data on what your competitors are doing in a wide variety of areas, including staffing, headcount, and pricing. So what are you waiting for? Download the complete survey now and turn directly to the sections that matter the most to the future of your career.

June 09, 2015

New products for LPM Acceleration and Pricing Visibility

Today, in connection with my speech at LMA’s P3 conference in Chicago, we are announcing the first new products jointly developed in our alliance with Project Leadership Associates.

The LPM Acceleration Program will help firms increase the speed and cost-effectiveness of LPM implementation, whether they have already started significant initiatives, or are just beginning to formalize their LPM efforts.

The Pricing Visibility Program will help firms adopt pricing and budgeting best practices, and select and implement technologies that support their pricing strategy.

For more details, see our product announcement.

January 28, 2015

A new alliance to improve pricing and legal project management

Press Release: January 28, 2015
Media Contacts: Scott Rosenberg, srosenberg@projectleadership.net, (312) 258-5318
  Jim Hassett, jhassett@legalbizdev.com, (617) 217-2578

Project Leadership Associates and LegalBizDev Announce a Strategic Alliance to Structure and Improve Visibility into Law Firm Pricing and Legal Project Management

CHICAGO, IL and BOSTON, MA.  Project Leadership Associates, specialists in legal business operations and technology solutions for more than 500 law firms and legal departments, and LegalBizDev, a leader in the emerging field of legal project management (LPM), today announced a new strategic alliance.

The two companies will collaborate with law firms to identify changes needed to succeed in today’s highly competitive marketplace. Through improvements in pricing, project management, and enhanced use of technology, law firms will be better able to provide their clients with increased value while protecting sustainable profit margins. 

The challenges that law firms face in this area have been documented in LegalBizDev Founder Jim Hassett’s recent book, Client Value and Law Firm Profitability, based on research interviews with 50 chairs, managing partners, and other leaders of AmLaw 200 firms.

To address these challenges, the two companies are now introducing Pricing Visibility℠ and Project Visibility℠ programs designed to standardize best practices and identify the processes, people, and technology that best fit each law firm’s needs and culture. The primary deliverables will be the development of playbooks and systems to be used in preparing bids and/or outlining the steps lawyers must take to manage matters throughout their lifecycle.

“We believe that over the next few years, effective pricing and project management will be the difference between success and failure for many law firms,” said Project Leadership Associates Executive Vice President Dan Safran. “We conducted extensive due diligence to identify tools that lawyers will actually use in developing pricing proposals and managing matters, instead of creating plans and processes that will sit on a shelf. We selected LegalBizDev as our partner in this venture due to their proven track record in helping lawyers to change their behavior and take action in these critically important areas.”

“People began talking seriously about legal project management just a few years ago, and to date our company has focused on getting firms started by producing internal champions and quick wins,” said LegalBizDev Founder and President Jim Hassett, Ph.D. “As the field began to mature, we were approached by a number of leading technology companies about forming partnerships. We declined them all, because we did not want to endorse a particular software solution at a time when both needs and products are changing rapidly. We were introduced to Project Leadership Associates through our joint relationship as strategic partners of Altman Weil. Once we learned about their history and approach and saw how they consulted to find just the right solution for each client rather than developing a single product which they attempted to sell to every firm, we knew that we had found the right partner for the next stage in LPM’s evolution.”

About Project Leadership Associates:  Project Leadership Associates (PLA) is the largest business and technology consulting provider focused on the legal market, in the United States. The company has consulted with over 500 law firm and corporate law departments in assessment and strategic planning, product selection, systems implementation, and operational improvement. With experience in all areas of legal practice and business operations, PLA’s seasoned consultants represent the “A-Team” of legal process and technology thought leadership and expertise. We are easy to work with, affordable to retain, practical in approach, and personally attentive. For more information please contact Project Leadership Associates at (877) 752-0451 or visit our web page.

About LegalBizDev:  LegalBizDev helps law firms increase client satisfaction and profitability by improving project management and business development. The company offers coaching, webinars, workshops, retreats, train the trainer programs, publications, and more to help each lawyer identify the action items that are most likely to produce immediate and practical results for their practice, their personality, and their schedule. Our behavior change processes help lawyers to make the best use of their limited time by quickly building on best practices from other law firms and other professions. For more information, visit our web page or call us today at (800) 49-TRAIN. 

December 17, 2014

Bloomberg interview regarding my new book (Part 1 of 2)

This interview originally appeared in Bloomberg BNA’s Corporate Counsel Weekly.  A pdf of the complete interview can be downloaded from our web page.

Bloomberg BNA: Tell us about your new book Client Value and Law Firm Profitability – what was your goal and who did you talk to?

Jim Hassett: In the last few years, millions of words have been written by law school professors and consultants about how the demands of the clients of major law firms are changing and what law firms should do about it.

The only thing that’s been missing from the conversation is statements by the people who actually run large law firms. These senior decision makers deal with these issues every day, and their very livelihood depends on coming up with the right answers. I wanted to hear their honest opinions about these highly sensitive issues but knew they could not speak openly if they were quoted by name, so I devised a research approach built around anonymity. I conducted every interview myself, and promised that while firm names would be listed in the report, the name of every individual I interviewed would remain confidential and no quote would be linked to a particular person or firm.

Leaders from 50 of the AmLaw 200 agreed to speak with me for this book. Forty-two percent were managing partners or chairs, and the remainder were senior partners and staff, including CEOs, COOs, and CFOs. They were indeed unusually frank in their responses, including the AmLaw 200 chairman who said that “Lawyers are about as dumb as you could possibly be about understanding how our product is made. The lawyers who understand how to make it and who can manage that process efficiently are going to be the winners.”

They also spoke freely about both problems and solutions, like the managing partner who noted that “I have a $10 million practice. But that could be a disaster for a firm, because it could cost them $11 million to get $10 million. But nobody ever talks about it that way.”

Bloomberg BNA: What was your most surprising finding?

Jim Hassett: While almost everyone agreed that client demands for greater value and lower fees have been putting pressure on law firm profits, firms were remarkably inconsistent about how they measure profits. When I asked, “If you compare profitability for two lawyers in your firm, is there a software program or formula used to calculate profitability or is the comparison more intuitive?” a surprising 26% said there was no such formula or program and that the answer was intuitive. For the other 74%, definitions and formulas varied widely, including total revenue, profits per equity partner, leverage, several different types of realization, and a variety of approaches to cost accounting.

To dig more deeply into this important issue, we conducted follow-up interviews with industry leaders from firms that sell software to analyze law firm profitability. Jeff Suhr, a VP at Intellistat/Data Fusion, reported that his company currently has 91 clients actively using their tools. How do they calculate profitability? Ninety-one different ways. The fundamentals are basically the same, but there are important differences in the assumptions and details. These differences can have significant implications for the way profitability is interpreted and can affect the way in which the figures are used to motivate lawyers to change their behavior so that they can better meet client needs in a way that can be sustained.

Bloomberg BNA: What are law firms doing to protect the bottom line?

Jim Hassett: They are trying lots of things, with mixed success. According to our data, the two most effective ways of protecting profitability are quite new to the legal profession: legal project management (LPM), and new staff positions in such areas as pricing, value, and LPM.

Other tactics have led to more mixed results, including relying on new technology, knowledge management (KM), and contract attorneys and outsourcing. The book includes many quotes from proponents saying that technology, KM, and outsourcing were the most valuable steps they took, and from others who said that they were a waste of time and money. These differences of opinion can be traced both to the different needs of different firms and to the details of how they tried to implement change in each of these areas.

Bloomberg BNA: Lots of people seem to agree that legal project management is important, but what exactly does it include?

Jim Hassett: That is an excellent question. The field is so new that experts disagree about what should be included and excluded from the concept. This has slowed progress, as seen in the remarks of one senior executive who noted: “We were just at a board meeting last week where we were talking about whether we should do formalized project management training. My answer to that is obviously yes, we absolutely should. But first we need to agree on what legal project management is.”

In my book Legal Project Management, Pricing and Alternative Fee Arrangements, I reviewed the short history of this movement and proposed the broad definition we use in our coaching, our training, and this research: “Legal project management adapts proven management techniques to the legal profession to help lawyers achieve their business goals, including increasing client value and protecting profitability.”

This broad definition includes everything from budgeting and communication to process improvement, knowledge management, and personal time management. We believe splitting hairs over what is and is not LPM is just another excuse to avoid action. Law firms need to move as quickly as possible to the real problem: What must we do today to meet client needs while remaining profitable and competitive?

Bloomberg BNA: Where is the pressure for LPM coming from?

Jim Hassett: From clients. One of the best sources of information about client demands is the Chief Legal Officer Survey which Altman Weil has been publishing for the last 15 years. (Full disclosure: LegalBizDev is a strategic alliance partner of Altman Weil.) One key question in the 2014 survey, which was released in November 2014, was, “Of the following service improvements and innovations, please select the three that you would most like to see from your outside counsel.” This year’s answers from 186 CLOs were greater cost reduction (58%), more efficient project management (57%), and improved budget forecasting (57%). Since LPM leads to cost reductions and to improved budget forecasting, you could say that the top three client requests were LPM, LPM, and more LPM. 

In business, everything starts with meeting client needs. But lawyers who understand LPM and apply it to their practice are still a tiny minority. As one senior executive put it: “One of the problems that we have, and frankly that most firms have, is just teaching lawyers how to manage a project, getting them out of the habit of just automatically starting out with some rote process. Just because the client says, ‘I think I might have a lawsuit’ doesn’t mean you go off and conduct 40 depositions. Lawyers need to sit down and talk about what the client is trying to accomplish. It might turn out that we are able to accomplish the client’s end goal without taking any depositions.”

When I asked about which aspects of LPM were most critical to firms’ short-term success, it is interesting that the top two areas participants singled out were defining scope and managing client communication. These issues cannot effectively be addressed by the expensive software that so many firms see as a starting point. They require partners to change their behavior and become more efficient.

Adapted with permission from Corporate Counsel Weekly Newsletter Vol. 29, No. 48, December 10, 22014. Copyright 2014, The Bureau of National Affairs, Inc. (800-372-1033) www.bna.com.   

September 09, 2014

Ark webinars to discuss my new book: Client Value and Law Firm Profitability

In association with the publication of my new book on Client Value and Law Firm Profitability, the Ark Group has scheduled a series of three webinars in which I will discuss key findings from our research with leading experts in the field.  All of the events will be recorded, so if you have a conflict on any of the dates below, you can listen to the webinars later any time, any place.

 

Wed Oct 8, 1-2 PM Eastern

Defining value and its impact on profitability

Law firms cannot meet client demands for greater value until they understand exactly what clients are looking for. This session will begin by reviewing data on how often clients simply want to lower costs, and how often they are looking for better understanding of business objectives, greater efficiency, improved communication, and other factors. It will then proceed to discuss how to define and manage profitability while meeting these client needs.

Jim Hassett, President, LegalBizDev

Michael Roster, Steering Committee Co-Chair, Association of Corporate Counsel’s Value Challenge

David Schaefer, Deputy Chairman; Chair, Corporate, Loeb & Loeb

 

Wed Nov 12, 1-2 PM Eastern

Legal project management: The state of the art

When law firms were asked what they were doing to meet the profitability challenge, many started by listing legal project management (LPM). But the term means different things to different firms, and some have had much greater success than others in changing lawyers’ behavior. This webinar will review data on what has worked best in LPM, and what hasn’t worked at all.

Jim Hassett, President, LegalBizDev

Albert Dotson, Government Relations & Land Development Practice Group Leader. Bilzin Sumberg

Richard Rosenblatt, Operations Partner, Labor & Employment Practice Group, Morgan Lewis

 

Wed Dec 10, 1-2 PM Eastern

Strategy and tactics for the new normal

In addition to LPM, firms have been experimenting with many related tactics including knowledge management, software, new staff positions in pricing and value, contract attorneys, outsourcing, alternative fee arrangements, and much more. The final webinar in the series will explore which strategies and tactics have been most effective, and what firms must do in the future to adapt to a changing marketplace.

Jim Hassett, President, LegalBizDev

Tom Clay, Principal, Altman Weil

John Paris, Partner, Chair of the Firm Innovation Team, Williams Mullen

 

To register, or for more information, see the announcement on the Ark Group web page, or contact Ark’s Peter Franken at pfranken@ark-group.com or (312) 212-1301.

 

April 22, 2014

Announcing a new workshop on how to define scope

Today, we are announcing a new half-day legal project management workshop entitled “How to Define Scope and Negotiate Changes.”

This workshop will substantially expand on a key portion of the content covered in our more basic course “How to increase client satisfaction and profitability with Legal Project Management,” which LegalBizDev has successfully offered since 2010.    It has been added to our curriculum in response to client needs highlighted in our research for the book Client Value and Law Firm Profitability, as explained in the post above.

The skills taught in this workshop are especially critical for fixed fee work. They also apply to any hourly arrangement that has a capped fee or a well-defined budget. 

For more information, including a two page summary of proprietary details of how the course is structured, email us at info@legalbizdev.com or call 617-217-2578.