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June 13, 2018

How CLOC is helping law firms to improve efficiency (Part 2 of 3)

According to a 2017 Inside Counsel article about CLOC:

[One] big challenge around project management in law departments is that legal teams didn’t understand it or what was being asked of them. So, a team of over 20 industry professionals… created an executive summary to educate legal leadership teams of what legal project management is, what the benefits are and how they can get started. The CLOC LPM Initiative team also created a playbook that includes a simple checklist for each matter stage and templates that can be used and configured by legal teams to easily apply project management in their delivery.

Aileen Leventon, Principal at Edge International, led the group that prepared the resulting 14-page paper, LPM for Legal Teams.  It begins with CLOC’s definition of LPM, built around four major stages – intake, planning, execution, and review – and is summarized in this diagram:

Communication_Pic2




Naturally, CLOC looks at LPM from the client’s point of view. Their paper provides details for each stage, listing activities, results, and success criteria. It also provides templates such as:

  • Matter Complexity Guidelines
  • Request for Legal Service Checklist
  • LPM External Briefing Checklist
  • Monthly Matter Status Report
  • Post-Matter Review Form

Some of these tools can be used as-is by law firms; others provide useful insights into the way sophisticated clients look at LPM.  (While the paper itself can be downloaded for free by anyone, the internal links to templates are available only to CLOC members.  However, joining CLOC is easy and relatively inexpensive.) 

You don’t need to be a CLOC member to download another useful document which was created as part of this initiative:  A 16 slide PowerPoint presentation entitled:  LPM – The Business Case and Action Plan for Legal Departments.

Again, as suggested by the title, this presentation is aimed at in-house law department staff, but many of the concepts apply to law firms as well.  One of the most interesting slides addresses the myth that project managers “spend lots of time documenting and updating project plans.”  In reality:

LPM is 90% about communication and speaking the client’s language:

  • Defining and managing the scope of the work
  • Making sure all those who need to be involved are in the loop
  • Making sure that risks are addressed on time by the right people
  • Providing status updates
  • Facilitating meetings and discussions
  • Communicating meeting minutes and action items.

The emphasis on communication is completely consistent with our experience coaching lawyers in LPM for more than a decade.  For example, when Bilzin Sumberg COO Michelle Weber was interviewed for our white paper, A Model for LPM Success: The Case of Bilzin Sumberg, she said: “If I were to distill [our LPM] program into one highlight, one thing that everyone learned and changed, it was improved communication. It sounds so simple but improving communication with clients and within the firm is very hard.”

Finally, for people who need to make the case for LPM – whether in a law department or a law firm – the slide “What is driving the need for LPM?” (reproduced below) may be especially useful:

What is driving the need for Legal Project Management?

  Table_Pic3

 

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