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March 07, 2018

A model for LPM success:  The case of Bilzin Sumberg (Part 1 of 5)

By Tim Batdorf and Jim Hassett

Executive summary

This series of posts describes the process that Bilzin Sumberg has used to implement LPM over the past few years, and provides examples of the benefits they have achieved in six major areas:

  1. Increased new business and profitability
  2. Meeting client needs for cost reduction
  3. Meeting client needs for predictable budgets
  4. Improved AFAs
  5. Improved definitions of scope
  6. Improved communication

As this series will make clear, Bilzin Sumberg has had many successes in changing the way they practice law to better meet client needs, and their LPM initiative has paid for itself several times over.  But their work is not done.

The final post in the series describes implications for other law firms based on Bilzin Sumberg’s experience with LPM.  Some of the tactics Bilzin Sumberg found to be effective are quite simple to implement.  For example, in the early stages of implementation there was some lawyer resistance to the term “legal project management.”  By changing the terminology, using a less intimidating term like "efficiency" as opposed to “legal project management,” Bilzin Sumberg was able to overcome lawyer pushback and develop broader buy-in. 

Other Bilzin Sumberg strategies required more effort, such as unrelenting support from senior management, bringing in external consultants, and a gradual increase of internal LPM staff. 

Nobody at Bilzin Sumberg – or any other law firm we’ve talked to – has ever said LPM is easy.  But they do say that well-planned LPM investments will pay off for their firm and their clients.  Greater efficiency and predictability is an absolute necessity for law firms wanting to survive and prosper in an increasingly competitive legal marketplace.


Lawyers often ask us to name law firms that serve as models for cost-effectively implementing legal project management (LPM).  

Our first public answer to this question appeared in this blog in 2013,  when we wrote “no law firm on the planet has achieved more [LPM] behavior change, more quickly or more efficiently” than Bilzin Sumberg, a Miami-based law firm with more than 100 lawyers.  Now, five years later, this series of posts will explain how the unrelenting support and follow-up by Bilzin Sumberg’s management has enabled it to hold the number one spot, and to achieve substantial benefits both for clients and for the firm.

Some firms are sure to disagree with this assessment, and a few may lay claim to the title for themselves.  It is certainly true that some groups at other firms have made greater progress in particular sub-areas of LPM, such as process improvement, pricing, and knowledge management.  But based on our research and consulting with hundreds of firms, we believe that no other firm has achieved greater LPM progress and experienced greater benefits across the board.  And the reason is simple: Bilzin Sumberg has produced more behavior change amongst its lawyers than any other firm.

Last fall, our CEO Tim Batdorf facilitated a 90-minute panel discussion at Bilzin Sumberg, in which eight of the firm’s leading LPM champions described what they had achieved to date, and what they had planned for the future.  Every lawyer in the firm was invited, and the discussion also provided a brief overview of two new LPM resources that Bilzin Sumberg recently adopted:  the digiral tools and templates in the fifth edition of our Legal Project Management Quick Reference Guide, and Prosperoware’s Umbria software to improve budgeting, tracking, and more.

The first speaker was the firm’s managing partner elect Al Dotson, who spoke about the benefits already experienced through the firm's adoption of LPM as well as the expected benefits with future progress. When Dotson held his first LPM meetings with each practice group leader:  

Every practice group said LPM didn’t apply to them. Every practice group said that they were unique. Every practice group said they could not use LPM. Every single one.

In the final section of these posts – “Implications for other firms” – we will explain that this sort of initial resistance is almost universal.  To overcome this resistance, in our experience, the support of key leaders is an absolute prerequisite for success.  

In some cases, we have worked with firms that made significant LPM progress when they were led by a partner who strongly believed in it.  But then the leader left, and the initiative fizzled as new management stressed new priorities.

At Bilzin Sumberg, Dotson, along with managing partner John Sumberg and COO Michelle Weber, have persisted in gently prodding partners to see how LPM could help them, following the five key approaches explained in our white paper “The Keys to LPM Success.” 

  1. Focus on changing behavior and solving problems
  2. Aim for quick wins to create internal champions
  3. Publicize successes within the firm
  4. Use just-in-time training materials
  5. Take action now and follow up relentlessly

Although these approaches are important for success, LPM is not a “one-size-fits-all,” well-defined linear process or a simple set of steps.  It is a mindset which must be constantly reinforced.  And the behaviors that lawyers change as a result of this new mindset evolve over time in response to changes in the legal marketplace.  

As Bilzin Sumberg COO Michelle Weber summed it up: “LPM is not a silver bullet.  It is an ongoing and continual process of gradually modifying behavior, with little moments of clarity.  To create LPM acceptance in a law firm culture, you have to keep reinforcing it.”

LPM Benefits

Increased new business and profitability 

To evaluate any LPM initiative, it makes sense to start by going directly to the bottom line, to see whether LPM has increased new business and/or improved profitability.  

At the panel discussion last fall, Al Dotson, Bilzin Sumberg’s managing partner elect and head of the firm’s Land Development & Government Relations Practice Group, began the discussion by saying:

I have successfully used legal project management to generate business many times.

In a previous LPM panel discussion – held to kick off their firm-wide LPM initiative in 2012 – Dotson described how one of his clients was so impressed by the legal project plan he had produced in his coaching that the client awarded Bilzin Sumberg a significant amount of new work.

This success encouraged other partners to volunteer for coaching, which in turn has led to many other examples of new business which can be directly attributed to LPM.  To cite just one example from the 2017 panel, real estate chair Jim Shindell described how a new client needing a series of condominium construction loans had first heard of Bilzin Sumberg:   

We had just saved another client with that same bank a ton of money with the speed and efficiency in which we were able to do the deal.

The new client then hired Bilzin Sumberg because of their proven efficiency on this same subject matter with the exact same lender.

Proof of new business from LPM is relatively easy to find, but exact figures for how much the LPM initiative has increased realization and profitability is harder to come by.  Like most firms, Bilzin Sumberg does not publicize its exact realization or profitability figures.  But there can be no doubt that many of the changes described in this series have increased both figures.  As COO Michelle Weber summed it up:

As a result of LPM, we have definitely decreased write-offs and reduced the number of times we need to go back to clients to discuss budget changes.


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